More than just Fair Trade

Established in 1979 as a Christian response to poverty, Traidcraft is the UK’s leading fair trade organisation. Its mission is to fight poverty through trade, practising and promoting approaches to trade that help poor people in developing countries transform their lives.

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Traidcraft and all its supporters put justice at the heart of everything we do so that thousands of farmers and artisans across Africa, Asia and Latin America, and their communities, have hope and a sustainable future. Do you know that smallholder farmers grow 70% of the world’s food, but make up half of the world’s hungriest people?

Traidcraft seeks out those who can most benefit from their help working with them from the very beginning, working through the difficulties, catching people when they fall.

Traidcraft helps whole communities to grow and flourish. From your community straight to a remote co-operative or individual farmer in the developing world. When you buy from Traidcraft, you’re directly connected to the people who benefit. Whether it’s a stall in church, your workplace coffee or a school tuckshop, you’re making a real difference.

When Traidcraft helped establish the Fairtrade Mark in 1992, they committed to regular support, investment and pioneering innovation into new sectors, pushing the boundaries so that more farmers could feel the benefits of fair trade. They’re about responsible, accountable business and they believe responsible customers will choose to spend their money in a socially responsible way.

‘Please buy more’ is a message Traidcraft often hears from producers. Selling a product for a fair price and being treated as an equal partner can transform the life of someone trapped in poverty.

That’s why buying fair trade from Traidcraft just isn’t the same as buying from the supermarket.

A Special Partnership

“Millions of people still live in absolute poverty and urgently need the sort of practical help that Traidcraft can offer. Selling Fairtrade food in church is a practical way of answering God’s call for justice for the poor.”

John SentamuArchbishop of York

Further information can be found at: